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West Pasco Timeline of Events

One of the best ways to see an overview of any history is by use of a timeline. It can be in the form of a graphical entity showing the most important aspects of a particular history over the years, or simply by a list with dates and brief description next to it.

Our friends over at West Pasco Historical Society have decided on the latter and provided us with a nice concise list of major events happening in the area over the centuries.

ca. 900-1500. Native Americans known as the Tocobaga Indians live in small villages at the northern end of Tampa Bay.
1838. The name Pithlochascotee River appears on a map.
1859. Pittitochoscolee, a small settlement located where Port Richey is today, appears on a map.
1863-1864. Salt is produced at Salt Springs, about one mile north of the Pithlachascotee River.
1877. A list of Hernando County schools for 1877-78 shows the Anclote, Baillie (Elfers) and Lang (Hudson) schools.
1878. The Anclote and Hopeville post offices are established.
1882. Hudson becomes a place name as the Hudson Post Office is established in the home of Isaac Washington Hudson.
1883. The Gulf Key Post Office is established. (Later names for this area were Argo and Aripeka.)
1884. Port Richey becomes a place name as Aaron McLaughlin Richey establishes a post office in his home at the mouth of the Pithlachascotee River. (The post office replaced Hopeville post office.)
1887. Pasco County is formed from the southern part of Hernando County.
1890. A commercial sponging venture is started at Bailey’s Bluff.
1904-1912. A large sawmill is in operation at Fivay.
1909. Elfers becomes a place name as the Elfers Post office is established. (The area was previously known as Baillie or the Baillie settlement.)
1912-1913. The Sass Hotel, the first major structure in Port Richey, is constructed.
1913. George Sims and a partner purchase the Port Richey Company and begin a major effort to develop the area.

To see the rest, click over to the West Pasco Historical Society.

 

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